The 411 On Self-Injury

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    A student walks through the hallways of their high school while being stared down by their classmates.

    There are marks on their wrist that no one can get a good look at, although it’s quite obvious as to what it is.

    As whispers run down the hall, the student knows that everyone is looking at their bloodstained and slit wrists from the cuts they gave themselves last night.

    Is the student a boy or a girl? It doesn’t matter. The color of the blood and the shape of the wounds are still the same. The reason why is what really matters.

    Cutting has been acknowledged by society to be a simple cry for help, which is definitely true of its origin, but there is a little more to it for many who begin this horrific habit.

    While it might start out as a self-infliction that you believe is a one-time thing, or even a small attempt at suicide, it actually can become an addiction.

    The trend #cuts4bieber that convinced innocent fans of Justin Bieber to cut themselves so he might stop smoking pot was not just horrific because of those that participated in the seriousness of the situation, but also because of those who taunted it.

    Between the pictures posted that might have been real, to those who were just joking around for a few retweets, the situation was stomach-turning.

    In reality, cutting is not something we can stop a person from actually doing, but we might be able to convince them why they shouldn’t, or how to get help. 

    Some of those who cut do it to get the attention of those around them when they feel invisible or silenced, and some may do it to distract themselves from other pain from outside sources.

    Just like the Aurora shooting, or the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, the urge to cut stems from psychological trauma. Although they may not be murdering dozens of people, they are still hurting themselves and potentially putting their own life in danger.

    Whatever the case may be, it is NOT something that should be taken lightly, and definitely NOT something to joke about.

    Whether the cutting was just a “one-time thing,” an attempt at suicide, or a continuous habit, something should be done.

    If you are a cutter, or know someone who struggles with this addiction, please don’t be afraid to do something about it.

    Go to http://www.selfinjury.com for referral to therapists and getting tips on how to stop.

    *To Write Love On Her Arms (http://www.TWLOHA.com)

    Call these hotlines and speak up:

    1-800-273-TALK

    1-800-DON’T-CUT

    1-800-334-HELP 

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