Jay Z‘s music streaming service Tidal recently announced that $1.5 million of the proceeds from its Tidal X: 10/20 charity concert, which took place in Brooklyn back in October, will be distributed to Black Lives Matter and several other organizations leading social justice movements. Beyoncé, Nicki Minaj and Jay Z, who all have a stake in Tidal, handpicked the organizations, many of which are focused on overcoming racial inequality within our country. “The process of acquiring recommendations [for nonprofits] was collaborative and inspired by the message that speaks to racial and social inequities and injustice in our society,” said Dania Diaz, managing director of philanthropy at Roc Nation. “Each year we will support a different initiative. Our ideology is to have a hifi level of consciousness in everything we do.” Said Tidal in a statement: “All of the organizations selected work to uphold the purpose of the Tidal X: 1020 Fund, which is to support nonprofit organizations dedicated to advancing positive community relations and effecting systemic change for the development and sustainability of just societies.” Read more.


Unemployment Rate Declines, But Racial Gap is Still Prevalent

According to the latest jobs report, 150,000 jobs were created in January and the unemployment rate is the lowest it’s been in eight years. But the data also shows that the rate of unemployed Blacks is 8.8 percent, while it’s 4.3 percent for Whites. “One of the problems is that we continue to have a tale of two economies,” said Imara Jones, an economist and writer. “[The improvement] is mostly true for people who are white, have good educations, and are tied to those sectors that are flourishing in the global economy. And then we have the economy of everyone else that has been left out and left behind.” The research shows that African-Americans are having a hard time bouncing back from the struggles of the recession. “That disparity is very persistent and it’s present whether we’re in a recession or in a recovery. It’s present at all levels of education,” said Valerie Johnson of the Economic Policy Institute. Read more.


U.S. Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch Addresses Hate Crimes, Police Brutality, and Voting Rights

U.S. Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch took the opportunity to discuss the Justice Department’s plans to address hate crimes and voting rights during the 35th annual Fifth Congressional District Black History Month Breakfast in Maryland on Saturday. “We’ve gone to court to defend the right to vote that so many fought so hard to secure, because as we take this month to consider hallowed places, for African-Americans surely, surely the voting booth must be one of them,” said Lynch before a crowd of hundreds of Maryland residents. “We’ve convicted more defendants on hate crimes charges than in any other time in history because this country should be a safe place for all who seek freedom.” In regards to the persistent issue of police brutality in our country, Lynch said that the Justice Department is “spearheading efforts to build trust between law enforcement officers and the communities we serve.” Read more.

VIDEO SOURCE: Inform