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Say goodbye to your Nexux 7 and Kindle Fire, the new mini tablet to be the next big thing will be the iPad mini.

According to a New York Times report, the iPad mini will cost much less than its $499, normal-sized counterpart.
A Bloomberg report stated that Apple will launch the mini iPad this October. It added that the new model will have a screen that’s 7 inches to 8 inches diagonally, less than the current 9.7-inch version.

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It is unclear whether or not the iPad mini will have Retina Display like the new iPad, although even the latest iPad touch utilizes Retina Display, so we can’t imagine why it wouldn’t.

In comparison to the other mini tablets on the market, the iPad has a very good chance of completely killing any competition.

Nexus 7 is the first seven inch tablet with 1.3GHz Nvidia Tegra 3 quad-core CPU, which includes a 12-core Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). Unlike Google’s tablet, Amazon’s Kindle Fire has a less powerful OMPA 4430, dual-core processor, clocked at 1GHz. The Nexus 7 also has 1 GB RAM, while the Kindle Fire ships with 512MB RAM. Apple could easily outdo the competition by going for higher RAM and a faster processor.

Neither the Nexus 7 nor Kindle Fire has expandable memory and both come with only 8GB of memory. The devices also do not have 3G connectivity, a feature that Apple’s new mini iPad could support and thus kill the competition.

The Kindle Fire doesn’t have a camera while Nexus 7 has a 1.2 megapixel front camera for video-chatting. If the new iPad mini has both, then both the Fire and Nexus 7 could be in some serious trouble. 

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If Apple really wants to, they won’t have to worry about anyone else in the tablet market very soon, however unless their pricepoint is still too high for their target audience, other companies may still have the ability to move in. Only time will really be able to tell, but be sure to check back in to GlobalGrind for updates.

SOURCE: FirstPost