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Instead of the World Cup ending in celebration it ended in terror, Somali Islamic militants carried out a twin suicide bombing in the Ugandan capital Kampala killing 64 people. At least 71 people were hospitalized, police spokeswoman Judith Nabakooba said.

According to CNN the casualties included one American death, the U.S. Embassy said. The American killed was Nate Henn, according to an organization that works with children in Uganda called Invisible Children. Henn was in the country working with Ugandan students.

In Mogadishu, Somalia, Sheik Yusuf Sheik Issa, an al-Shabab commander, told The Associated Press early Monday that he was happy with the attacks in Uganda but refused to confirm or deny that al-Shabab was responsible.

‘Uganda is one of our enemies. Whatever makes them cry, makes us happy. May Allah’s anger be upon those who are against us,’ Sheik said.

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‘Nate was not a glory-seeker and never sought the spotlight. He asked not to be made a hero of,’ the post said. ‘But the life he lived inspires reflection and imitation.’

The blasts came two days after a commander with the Somali group, al-Shabab, called for militants to attack sites in Uganda and Burundi, two nations that contribute troops to the African Union peacekeeping force in Somalia.

The Uganda bombing ended an amazing World Cup, with Spain outlasting the Netherlands with a 1-0 overtime victory.  As we mourn those who lost their lives in Uganda, we celebrate with Spain and South Africa for an amazing six weeks of football.

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