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The title is apocalyptic, we know, but how else can you describe the murderous rampage Mother Nature has unleashed on the American South?

The Mississippi River Is rising, flooding folks out their homes, there was a major earthquake and nuclear meltdown in Japan. In the US over 300 people have died from storm related injuries in the South in Georgia and Alabama. Storms also touched down in Arkansas, Missouri, both Carolinas, both Virginias, Maryland, Indiana and Ohio. The storms in Alabama and Georgia were miles wide.

In April alone, there were over 600 tornados in the South, up from the average of 160. WTF is going on? Is Judgement Day at hand? Will the world end on May 21, 2011 as some are predicting?

Scientists, laymen and plain ‘ol regular people are baffled. Some are pointing fingers towards climate change, revealing that a build up of greenhouse gases may have triggered the storms. Others say its just bad luck, nothing more. End of the world fanatics and Bible thumpers however, think the end is neigh. 

 “In my career I have never seen this many tornadoes or this many fatalities,” said Joshua Wurman, the lead tornado researcher and president of the Center for Severe Weather Research and widely known for his role as the scientist on the Discovery Channel’s “Storm Chasers” show via Huffingtonpost.com.  

“We can’t say there is a correlation between a specific tornado and global change,” said program director Thomas Armstrong. “But the reports do indicate that there is a positive correlation between climate change and the frequency of conditions favorable to the formation” of tornadoes, he said, while stressing that the research is still preliminary.

Whatever the cause, luck, atmospheric change or doomsday, things done change.

After the break images and watch video of the storms HERE.

Above: Two men rest among the remains of Alberta Baptist Church in Tuscaloosa, Alabama on April 28, 2011. Images via Time.

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Former journalist Chrstopher England captured the havoc on video in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.

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Aerial view of an area devastated by tornadoes in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. 

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Severely damaged cars are left on the street in Pleasant Grove, Alabama.

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A woman and her daughter examine their things after the storm in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. 

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A block of homes in ruins after the storm in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.

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Locals sit among debris after the storm in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.

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Tuscaloosa, Alabama after yesterdays’s storm.