'America' - Los Angeles Premiere

Oh, Stacey Dash. This afternoon, BET Jams completely came for the actress-turned-FOX pundit’s life, showcasing all the rap videos Ms. Dash appeared in over the years. So many, in fact, that it made a solid video block.

Earlier this week, Stacey blasted the growing conversation about the Oscars’ very real diversity problem, and went so far as to say that BET and the NAACP Image Awards shouldn’t exist. The resulting Internet dragging of Stacey is rooted in a huge frustration among people of color. In a moment where an open and honest discussion could result in change, the entertainment world that has benefited from Black culture forgets its history. It’s painful, confusing, and infuriating when Black artists gone conservative become stumbling blocks and not agents of change.

Even Stacey’s own family member, Dame Dash, will not support her recent clueless antics. In a recent interview, he steered clear of his cousin’s views, saying: “It really isn’t the best thing to hear Dash associated with coonin’, you know what I’m saying. It’s funny man, but it is what it is, that’s my life.” 

We completely share Dame’s dismay. Stacey’s mainstream film credits begin and end with Clueless, one of the biggest classics of the ’90s. But today, I was reminded that even in that role, she played the token Black friend who seemed to be a script requirement in teen films during that era.

We understand that Stacey’s been in the industry for decades, but maybe she forgot a few of her steps along the way.

Here’s a solid reminder that before FOX checks sustained her, Black media held her down. And if she continues to forget, trust that the Black community will continue to remind her. As our friends at BET Jams perfectly stated in hashtags, remember where you come from, baby. Because when it all falls down, Black folks will still welcome you back.

1967: Stacey Dash was born in the South Bronx

The South Bronx, the South South Bronx, is the hood. Stacey grew up with Blacks and Latinos. In the hood. A little history lesson of the Boogie Down seems appropriate.

1992: Cover of JET with Damon Wayans 

At her start, Stacey landed the cover of JET to promote her film Mo’ Money with Damon Wayans. That is peak Blackness.

1995: Stacey got her huge mainstream break in Clueless 

A pretty dress and a Valley accent doesn’t cover up the fact that Dionne is the trusty Black sidekick friend with a touch of sass. As if you thought differently.

1997: Stacey was the beach beauty in MJG’s “That Girl” video

As the childhood crush of rappers and every man who grew up in the ’90s, Stacey was an A-list coup for the very Black, very hip-hop, videos.

2004: Stacey breaks hearts on the cover of KING Magazine

I remember seeing this cover on subway newsstands, and how every guy I knew scrambled to get their own copy, or two. She may want to forget this one, but the Internet will not.

2009: Kanye West’s “All Falls Down” video

On “All Falls Down,” Kanye West rhymes about a girl dealing with some issues that you can’t believe. This is one of Stacey’s biggest moments, and everyone gave Yeezy so many props for featuring the crush-worthy star, still as gorgeous as ever, in his clip.

2009, 2011: Recurring role on The Game 

Saying that BET shouldn’t exist, after collecting checks from the network for two seasons on its hit show, is probably not wise. And BET’s reaction was priceless.

2010: As Rick Ross’ damsel in distress in the “Super High” video, featuring Ne-Yo

There is no denying that Stacey is a stunning woman, but the now-conservative talking head got a check from Rozay to appear in his music video only six years ago. #NeverForget

2011: Stacey starred in VH1’s drama, Single Ladies

Back in 2011, Stacey appeared on the first season of Single Ladies. The cast included a host of talented Black actresses like Lauren London, Paula Patton, and Eve. Totally happened, Stacey.

SOURCE: BET, Complex | PHOTOS: Getty, Instagram, Twitter